Perception of facial expressions differs across cultures

A comparison of processing of emotions found that Chinese participants relied more on the eyes to detect expression whereas Western Caucasians relied more on the eyebrows and mouth.  Curious.

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via Perception of facial expressions differs across cultures.

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Infants trained to concentrate show added benefits

Interesting, but as the article notes, the study did not measure the sustainability of these gains.  Also, I think it would be interesting to compare the training condition to shared book reading – just as a gauge (reflecting my bias and belief that reading books together is one of the best things you can do for your child’s cognitive and socio-emotional growth).

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via Infants trained to concentrate show added benefits.

Fueling the Brain With a Milkshake

As if Alzheimer’s isn’t bad enough!  Now let me encourage you to drink a milkshake that may cause some gastrointestinal discomfort, will cost $70 – 90/month and that has not been shown to make any significant difference in outcomes for the standard Alzheimer patient.  How refreshing.  Grrrr.

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via Fueling the Brain With a Milkshake.

Marshmallow test points to biological basis for delayed gratification

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via Marshmallow test points to biological basis for delayed gratification.

The original Mischel study showed a robust relationship between ability to delay gratification in early childhood and later success – as measured by graduation rates, income, incarceration rates etc. (see YouTube videos for recent reenactments).  Recent research by BJ Casey and colleagues suggests that these differences in self-control continue into adulthood and reflect distinct neural patterns.